Month: February 2018

Do Trees talk?

Fortey sounds appalled when he was informed by Simard that he detected a spiritual aspect in the forest saying,

“Spiritual? Oh dear, oh dear, well there’s nothing to be said about that. Look, trees are networkers. They do communicate in their own way. What worries me is that people find this so appealing that they immediately leap to faulty conclusions. Namely that trees are sentient beings like us.”

Meanwhile, Fortey revealed a notable offender named Peter Wohlleben regarding this matter. He said,

“There is a lot of good new science in his book, and I sympathize with his concerns, but he describes trees as if they possess consciousness and emotions. His trees are like the Ents in Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings.”

On the other hand, Wohlleben smiles and answered Fortey’s criticism saying,

“Scientists insist on language that is purged of all emotion. To me, this is inhuman, because we are emotional beings, and for most people, scientific language is extremely boring to read. The wonderful research about giraffes and acacia trees, for example, was done many years ago, but it was written in such dry, technical language that most people never heard about it.”

According to Smithsonian Mag,

“Wohlleben’s first priority is to not be boring, so he uses emotional storytelling techniques. His trees cry out with thirst, they panic and gamble and mourn. They talk, suckle and make mischief. papa survey is where you can voice out.

If these words were framed in quotation marks, to indicate a stretchy metaphorical meaning, he would probably escape most of the criticism. But Wohlleben does not bother with quotation marks because that would break the spell of his prose. Then one day, it’s all over. The trunk snaps and the tree’s life is at an end. ‘Finally,’ you can almost hear the young trees-in-waiting sigh.”

Nashville City strengthens tree protection

Nashville Mayor Megan Barry plans to sign an executive order on February 13, which contains additional protections for trees on the city-owned property, restructures the government’s urban forestry staff, and instructs city agencies to enforce tree standards.

“Nashville’s recent development boom has placed significant pressure on the ‘urban tree canopy,” the mayor’s office revealed. According to Tennessean, the efforts come as Nashville grows rapidly and its trees lose ground to new real estate developments. As per the report, advocates estimate over 50,000 trees a year are hemorrhaging in Davidson County

Barry’s order frames the city’s trees as a public asset. The mayor believes that like a sewer or electrical system, it needs to be maintained. “Urban tree canopy is a utility that improves air quality, manages stormwater, supports public health, provides economic benefits, and increases the quality of life for Nashville residents,” the mayor added.

Moreover, executive director Carolyn Sorenson of the Nashville Tree Foundation said, “Something like a Fort Negley is not going to happen again. We are very encouraged. We can be more effective as a nonprofit when the city leads by example.” Advocates have complained that the city has not been enforcing the tree standards it has on the books. Builders and developers have been knocking down trees without planting the required replacements. After all, the Codes Department is responsible for overseeing tree replacement and protection.

Barry’s order puts emphasis to this: “During the permitting process for any development or construction, trees shall be a major consideration in the review of a grading or building permit application and the issuance of occupancy permits.”

Furthermore, the executive order also streamlines some of the city’s tree staffing and communications. With this, the urban forestry program manager was empowered to coordinate among city agency heads and directly advise the mayor.

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